MRDe-music Trains: The Siberia, Ont. Curve Layout
There was a sight for my co-workers on "Bring a Model Train To Work Day" . Responding to one of my co-workers jibes about the Bad Junction layout looking like Siberia in it's unfinished styrafoam glory, I made a Siberian-themed layout and brought in a small layout to amuse and confound all.

Built for "Take A Model Train To Work Day" 2005, Siberia Curve is set in a fictional Northern Ontario town near James Bay. In the distopia that we're set in, it about 1980, the St. Lawrence Seaway's operation had been disrupted, and ports in Hudson's and James Bay were built to deal with the disruption. This development of the Ontario north led to large communities being established, and the expansion of GO Transit service for mass transit, as well as a major expansion of the Canadian Pacific's (CP's) freight services and the Federal Government's VIA service. Sadly, competition from a new freight carrying service now threatens the railroad's viability.

Siberia Curve, near the Eastern edge of the St. James Bay port town of Siberia, Ontario, is named for the sharp curve that takes the "lower line" north when it passes the Siberia Viaduct, a feature of one of the spur lines off of the CP main line (the "upper track"). Let's take a look ...

A CP F-unit pulls a short freight train on the "upper track", overlooking the Curve;


In the background, the CP freight train ... a view of the Siberia Viaduct, with a Go Train passing on the "lower track" (sorry for the focus issues here);


Looking east from a helicopter above the 'lower track''s entry into the Siberia East tunnel ... the viaduct and the CP main line 'upper track' can be seen. The Curve is just past the "Bird's Corps-ified Animals" building, and the railroad's new competitor is evident in the parking lot by the Bird building;


Detail of the "Bird's Corps-ified Animals" building, and the railroad's new competitor;

"It's a Tarp", a local company just west of "Bird's Corps-ified Animals", that manufactures and distributes inductrial coverings and fasteners;


Looking west, the Curve can be seen, with a GO Train making the sharp turn. Peter and Urville Trid's Chemical works can be seen just past the Viaduct, with a couple of small chemical tank cars on the spur that serves it;


The layout entire;